Physics is a complex subject that needs to be taught with dedication. Students might need the support of extra learning methods to understand the concepts and theories of this science subject. Parents often sign their kids up for online physics classes in India. However, physics games are also a good way to teach students physics.

Children naturally enjoy physics because it’s endlessly fascinating, accessible, relevant, and fun.

When you think of physics, you might think of a professor or a scientist working out complex formulas or scribbling notes on paper. However, at its most basic, physics is a subject that children find endlessly fascinating, accessible, and relevant. This is why physics is important to a child's foundational education.

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Every day Physics Activities for Kids

Children are natural physicists. They learn about the world through play as they jump from play equipment, dangle from a tree, or topple a block structure. Add a few simple physics activities, and you can enrich your child’s learning even more.

Choose video games wisely to get as much from them as possible.
Video games have been proven by experts to help with developmental skills. | Photo on Foter.com

Offer Your Kid Magnets

Offer your child a magnet, and together, discover magnetic items around the house. Discuss why some items are magnetic, and some aren’t.

Make Them Understand Buoyancy

Explore with your child why some objects float and some sink. Fill the sink with water and drop various household objects, such as a paper clip, a sponge, a wooden spoon, and a metal spoon, into the water. Why do some objects, such as a sheet of paper, float initially before they sink? Or make a game of it with the old favorite, “Pooh Sticks,” from “Winnie the Pooh.” Drop sticks from one side of a bridge and race to the other to see which stick appears first.

Discover a whole world of Physics for kids on the internet.

Teach Them About Gravity

Drop objects, such as socks, shoes, feathers, a flat sheet of paper, and a crumpled piece from a stair landing or high position. Do all things touch the ground eventually? Why do some objects seem to fall faster than others? Make paper airplanes to explore concepts of flight and gravity at the same time. Watch a bird in flight. Why doesn’t it fall to the ground?

Talk about Machines

One of the basic principles of physics is that six simple machines can make our work easier, are found in every aspect of daily life, and include the lever, inclined plane, wheel and axle, screw, wedge, and pulley. Here’s how to explore each of those:

  • To explore inclined planes, help your child build ramps from PVC pipe or cut a pool noodle in half to race marbles and cars. Do the marbles move faster if the ramp is steeper? Why
  • Learn about wheels and axles as you explore wheelbarrows, tricycles, and scooters. Use a wheelbarrow or toy dump truck to move dirt from one area to another.
  • Explore wedges, screws, and levers with child-size tools. As your child grows, try child-sized versions of the real thing.
  • Make a pulley or purchase one at a hardware store and experiment with lifting buckets of sand, blocks, and other objects.

Motion and Inertia

Try rolling or pushing various objects, such as balls, a block, or a toy car. Why do some objects roll easily while others require more effort? Do heavy objects roll more easily than lightweight ones? Does the surface they roll on make a difference?

Light

Study shadows throughout the day. Why are they longer at certain times of the day than others? Do they look different when the sun shines brightly versus when the day is overcast? Do they ever disappear altogether? Make shadows on a wall with a flashlight or play flashlight tag. Explore why light dispels darkness as soon as a light is turned on. Can darkness dispel light?

Heat/Energy

Keep a thermometer outside and record the temperature over several days or weeks. Notice any other conditions accompanying changes, such as a cloudy or rainy day. Demonstrate what happens to water when it is frozen or heated, and introduce the concept of properties of matter.

Physics is best learnt by having fun!
Play games to help your children learn new things. | Photo credit: Jim Sneddon on Foter.com

Spinning Tops

Use these toys as tools to explore motion. Ask your child open-ended questions (questions with more than a yes or no answer). How hard do you push each type of top before it begins to spin? Are light or heavy tops easier to spin? Are tall or short tops easier to spin? Can a top with a penny taped to it maintain a spin

Tools can extend our senses, allowing us to obtain more information than we would. Magnifiers extend our sight by making objects look bigger. This tool is fun to use to make the world look blurry, our eyes look huge, and to look closely at everything! Magnifiers reveal aspects of nature that are too small to see with just our eyes. Examine skin, coins, flower structures, and insects—all objects with small parts that make up the whole.

Have you tried these fun Physics experiments yet?

Eye Droppers or Pipettes

Children who use eyedroppers and pipettes to move liquids learn much about how liquids behave. For example, they learn that when they squeeze the bulb, the dropper pushes air out and pulls water in when they release the bulb. Children at this age can also observe that water forms drop.

Show your child how to squeeze the dropper to force the air out of the bulb and how to release it to allow it to pop back into shape, drawing in air or liquid as it reforms. Your child can feel the air as it leaves the dropper by holding the dropper up to her cheek (away from her eyes) as she squeezes the bulb. Use the dropper to suck up small amounts of rain from a puddle or to mix colored water from one dish with water of a different color in another. Turn the dropper upside down to create a fountain. These activities have the added benefit of helping your child develop small motor control.

Balls

Use balls of the same size but different weights to explore how an object's mass (what we feel as weight) affects its motion. Which ball will roll farther if we give them the same push—the heavier or lighter ball? Children become very familiar with the effects of the pull of gravity as they throw or kick balls. They explore the properties of materials when they compare the bounce height of balls made of different materials. They will draw on these kinesthetic experiences in later science learning.

Mirrors

Playing with mirrors to reflect light and wondering how our image is reflected teaches children a beginning understanding of the properties of light. Bounce light off of different surfaces. A large plastic “baby” mirror, held freely, is especially good for this. Have your children use mirrors to look behind themselves. “Catch” some sunshine and reflect it to another surface outside or inside. Children can use a mirror to examine their faces to draw a self-portrait. Children are more likely to draw from the observations they see in the mirror and not from memory if they are encouraged to focus on parts of their face they don’t usually begin with, such as their nostrils. Ask, “Do you see the holes in your nose? How many are there?”

Online Physics Games for Kids

Virtual spaces are a great way to help kids grasp physics concepts like motion, gravity, sound, light, magnetism, and more. With these terrific physics picks, young students can build, toss, push, or even catapult objects big and small to see where and how they move. Older students can develop, test, and iterate challenges based on angular momentum, kinetic energy, and other complex physics concepts.

There are pros and cons to letting your kids use the internet after school or at weekends.
Make the most of your home Wi-Fi by using it to educate yourself in Physics. | Photo credit: mista stagga lee on Foter.com / CC BY

Here are the best free physics games for kids in 2022, all available online:

  • Thinkrolls and Thinkrolls 2: Designed for preschool to school-age kids. Kids play puzzle games and learn science concepts like gravity, buoyancy, levitation, elasticity, density, temperature, and acceleration.
  • Where’s My Water: Focused on liquid physics. Kids build pipes to deliver water to Swampy the Alligator. It is an app designed by Disney that a preschool and an adult can play.
  • Monster Physics: Kids can design their own machines and moving devices, build them, and test them out. It is a “hands-on” physics lab without the mess, and kids can see how their designs work in the “real” world.
  • Simple Physics: Kids can build a structure, like a treehouse, or a bridge, using available materials and then test out the design to see if it will work. Kids not only need to build a strong structure but also limit their budget within the range.
  • Abstract World: 30-level physics platformer and logical puzzle game where players roll yellow and green balls into the holes by moving plank supports.
  • Archery: See how gravity and force impact the arch of an arrow in this simple game with stick men as targets.
  • Balance: Shoot balls at either side of a balancing lever to collect coins, avoid bombs, shoot basketballs into a hoop, or complete other simple tasks.
  • Ball in the Cup: Move blocks, wedges, fans, and magnets to roll a ball into a cup. The artwork for this 20-level game is beautifully hand-drawn. Most levels are quite simple. The above picture shows the final level.

Physics is the branch of science that typically studies various phenomena and laws of the universe. It helps a person understand the nature, basic characteristics, and properties of different forms of matter and energy in the universe.

Learning physics with the help of textbooks, journals, and research papers is quite a tedious task; however, one can easily understand the basic concepts of physics by playing games.

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Shreyanjana

Shreyanjana is an archaeologist who ironically finds the written word to be the most powerful means of storytelling. A travel buff and a photography enthusiast, she has been writing and sharing stories of all sorts ever since she can remember.